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Browse Prior Art Database

Wear Robot

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049021D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Olson, GD: AUTHOR

Abstract

In order to test keybuttons and key mechanisms, it is desirable to have as simple a device as possible to effect the input motion to the keybutton while, at the same time, simulating the forces on the keybutton that would be generated by an operator's finger, such as a lateral motion as well as a vertical motion.

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Wear Robot

In order to test keybuttons and key mechanisms, it is desirable to have as simple a device as possible to effect the input motion to the keybutton while, at the same time, simulating the forces on the keybutton that would be generated by an operator's finger, such as a lateral motion as well as a vertical motion.

The shaft 10 is rotated to provide input motion to keybutton 12 and keybutton shaft 14. By the rotation, in a clockwise direction, of shaft 10, keybutton 12 and keybutton shaft 14 may be caused to cycle in the direction of arrow 13, thereby exercising the device. The movement is derived from the engagement of an outer ball-bearing race 16 with the top surface of keybutton 12. The inner race 18 is supported by an eccentric cam 20 physically attached to shaft 10 and rotating therewith. As shaft 10 rotates and cam 20 rotates therewith, the inner race 18 will be rotated with the effect of shifting balls 22 and outer race 16 in a generally circular oscillatory path in a clockwise direction. The point of engagement between the keybutton 12 and outer race 16 will remain substantially localized such that as the cam 20 rotates, the force, if any, caused by friction between keybutton 12 and race 16 will be tangential to the point of engagement between button 12 and race 16 and directed leftward in the direction of arrow 24. This not only will retain race 16 in a stationary position but will also create some small side loading factor approximating that o...