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Keyboard Entry for Display Terminal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049100D
Original Publication Date: 1982-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Motola, PD: AUTHOR

Abstract

Conventionally in display terminals associated with word processing systems, multiple keyboard arrangements are respectively available for different character sets. In other words, a single keyboard arrangement may be set up for each different character set. The present expedient goes beyond this. It provides multiple keyboard arrangements for the same character set which are tailored to an engraved keyboard.

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Keyboard Entry for Display Terminal

Conventionally in display terminals associated with word processing systems, multiple keyboard arrangements are respectively available for different character sets. In other words, a single keyboard arrangement may be set up for each different character set. The present expedient goes beyond this. It provides multiple keyboard arrangements for the same character set which are tailored to an engraved keyboard.

The need for this expedient comes about because of a general usage of engraved keyboards in association with word processing display terminals. For example, let us assume that a certain character set is required. If only one keyboard arrangement were available for the selected character set, certain characters and symbols on the arrangement of the keyboard for the selected character set would be likely not to be in the same key position as they would be on the engraved keyboard. However, through the expedient of a plurality of keyboard arrangements for the same character set, we meximize the number of keys in a selected keyboard arrangement which will be in coincidence with the actual engraved keyboard arrangement on the terminal being used. This results in improved human factor conditions for the operator by permitting keying from engraved positions rather through the use of overlays.

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