Browse Prior Art Database

Single Element Fiber Optic to Fiber Optic Coupler

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049101D
Original Publication Date: 1982-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Balliet, L: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Most fiber-optic to fiber-optic coupling today uses a rigid surface element or elements for guiding and aligning two fibers. Common among these is some form of V-groove. To minimize coupling loss, these devices require that the fibers have identical and concentric cladding and core diameters or that close tolerance be maintained.

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Single Element Fiber Optic to Fiber Optic Coupler

Most fiber-optic to fiber-optic coupling today uses a rigid surface element or elements for guiding and aligning two fibers. Common among these is some form of V-groove. To minimize coupling loss, these devices require that the fibers have identical and concentric cladding and core diameters or that close tolerance be maintained.

One exception to the approaches alluded to above is a unit which employs two resilient reference elements with precision holes drilled into them while the elements are under compression. The precision holes are produced by elaborate (costly) tooling. The two ends with precisely positioned holes then have fibers inserted, adhesive applied, and polishing provided. In many applications it is desirable to eliminate adhesives and polishing. The design described here overcomes most of the objections cited above and provides a highly serviceable coupling mechanism, the manufacture of which requires no precision tooling.

Fig. la shows the single element fiber-to-fiber coupler. The single element gasket 10 is made of a resilient material, such as neoprene. It contains a hole that is somewhat larger than the outside diameter of either fiber 12 or 13 being coupled. After standard fiber cleaning, fibers 12 and 13 are inserted and caused to butt against each other. Approximate alignment is provided by the slightly oversized hole in the gasket 10 at initial insertion. After the initial insertion, the f...