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Process for Auger Depth Profiling of Overcoat Thickness

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049115D
Original Publication Date: 1982-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Miller, AG: AUTHOR

Abstract

Profiles of coatings on substrates which tend to develop surface static charge are obtained by preparing test samples by applying a conductive layer prior to testing.

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Process for Auger Depth Profiling of Overcoat Thickness

Profiles of coatings on substrates which tend to develop surface static charge are obtained by preparing test samples by applying a conductive layer prior to testing.

The thickness of insulating coatings on photoconductor drums or the like for copiers affects drum life. The application of known Auger depth profiling is inadequate particularly where a polymer overcoat is used on a semiconductive or conductive substrate because the polymer tends to generate a static surface charge which diverts the Auger beam and distorts the Auger signal. The Auger depth profiling technique involves scanning a particular region of the test sample with an electron beam. The beam generates Auger electrons from approximately the top 50 Angstroms of the sample. At the same time, the test area is bombarded with energetic argon ions which continuously erode the surface. By monitoring the appropriate Auger signals while argon etching, the elements on the freshly exposed surface are recorded against the depth profile in minutes of profiling time.

The Auger depth profiling is obtainable with polymer-type coatings or the like if the sample As made conductive to reduce electron beam charging and damage. That is, in a typical application, the overcoated photoconductor sample is coated with a thin film of gold by sputter deposition. The gold film reduces the electron beam charging so that profiling is possible on the nonconductive polymer...