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Browse Prior Art Database

Thermostatic Heat Sink

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049124D
Original Publication Date: 1982-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kennison, RE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The present device will provide a controlled capacity for the dissipation of heat from a module, which dissipation capacity will increase as the temperature of the chip increases and decrease as the temperature of the chip decreases. This will also control the rate of heat dissipation, and also more closely regulate the device temperature.

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Thermostatic Heat Sink

The present device will provide a controlled capacity for the dissipation of heat from a module, which dissipation capacity will increase as the temperature of the chip increases and decrease as the temperature of the chip decreases. This will also control the rate of heat dissipation, and also more closely regulate the device temperature.

Fig. 1 is a sectional view of a module incorporating the improved heat dissipating device, and Fig. 2 is a perspective detail view of the strap portion of the device. As shown, a conventional ceramic substrate 10 has mounted thereon by flip-chip mounting an integrated circuit chip 12. A conventional metal cover 14 overlies the substrate 10 and chip 12, and is sealed thereto.

Disposed within the cover 14 is a metallic strap 16 formed of a good thermally-conducting material, such as Be/Cu. One end of the strap 16 is cut to form a plurality of fingers 18 which overlie the chip 12. The fingers 18 are bent and arranged to lie in several planes, as best shown in Fig. 2. The central finger is positioned to lie just on the chip under ambient conditions, with the other fingers at varying distances above the chip.

The strap 16 is secured to the cover 14 by means of a bi-metallic strip 20. The strip 20 is arranged such that it will tend to straighten or unbend upon heating and curl or bend further upon cooling.

In operation, the chip generates heat during use, raising the temperature within the cover 14. As the temp...