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Receiver/ Translator Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049168D
Original Publication Date: 1982-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Blumberg, RJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A circuit has been designed which receives signals from a ground-down open collector driver and translates them efficiently to ground-up Schottky current switch (SCS) levels, solving a problem of interfacing two different large-scale integrated circuit technologies. This is particularly useful since chips designed with high performance in mind usually have ground-down power supplies, while the generally higher density, lower performance chips usually have ground-up power supplies.

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Receiver/ Translator Circuit

A circuit has been designed which receives signals from a ground-down open collector driver and translates them efficiently to ground-up Schottky current switch (SCS) levels, solving a problem of interfacing two different large-scale integrated circuit technologies. This is particularly useful since chips designed with high performance in mind usually have ground-down power supplies, while the generally higher density, lower performance chips usually have ground-up power supplies.

The receiver, as well as the input levels from a ground-down driver and the SCS output levels, is shown in Fig. 1. For maximum noise tolerance, the receiver is used in conjunction with two other circuits, as shown logically in Fig. 2A and electrically in Fig. 2B. The output of the receiver circuit is compared to the reference network voltage, which is stable with respect to ground, and both phases of the input signal are generated. The receiver circuit itself is simply a level-shifting scheme consisting of the clamp network T1. R1 and R2, and the Schottky diode. Resistor R3 acts to improve the noise tolerance. The AC noise tolerance characteristic is given in Fig. 3.

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