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Browse Prior Art Database

Waveform Shaper for a Receiving Circuit Connected to a Transmission Line

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049182D
Original Publication Date: 1982-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Blum, A: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Waveform-shaping circuits with hysteresis loop characteristics, such as a Schmitt trigger, are generally used to convert distorted input signals into output signals that are ready for use.

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Waveform Shaper for a Receiving Circuit Connected to a Transmission Line

Waveform-shaping circuits with hysteresis loop characteristics, such as a Schmitt trigger, are generally used to convert distorted input signals into output signals that are ready for use.

In data processing, multicomputer and teleprocessing systems, data pulses are transmitted on transmission lines with a substantial capacitive load, so that these lines cannot be properly terminated. This leads to reflected waves when the transmission lines are energized by drivers and transmitter circuits, respectively, so that the amplitude of an input signal IN drops at least once more below a given switching threshold V(REF).

In order to obtain faster switching times at the receiving station, it is expedient to eliminate such reflected waves. Conventional methods provide for a matched termination or a damping of the transmission lines. While the former is rather expensive and requires much power, the latter limits the switching times obtainable.

When drivers switch FET storage device networks operating with relatively large voltage shifts, these problems are intensified and can be solved by using the dynamic Schmitt trigger described below. Compared to the state of the art, the occurrence of reflected waves on the transmission lines is tolerated, because the waves are suppressed by the threshold offset of the curve V(REF(DYN)), as the dynamic Schmitt trigger is released in response to the first slope of...