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Magnetic Regulator Fault Protection Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049232D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 3 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hemena, W: AUTHOR

Abstract

Magnetic Boost Regulator (MBR) technology is a fairly new, highly efficient design used for high current power supplies. This technique allows a small number of control devices (active transistors) to regulate high currents with minimal heat loss and efficient use of the control devices, by enabling the devices to operate at high power levels instead of only high current levels as compared to the usual series regulator technology.

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Magnetic Regulator Fault Protection Circuit

Magnetic Boost Regulator (MBR) technology is a fairly new, highly efficient design used for high current power supplies. This technique allows a small number of control devices (active transistors) to regulate high currents with minimal heat loss and efficient use of the control devices, by enabling the devices to operate at high power levels instead of only high current levels as compared to the usual series regulator technology.

However, like series regulators, any regulating device failure (normally a short circuit) causes the regulator to fail in an uncontrolled manner, resulting in an over-voltage condition intolerable to the logic/ memory loads. This often results in catastrophic failure of the load circuitry.

The former solution to this problem was to place high current SCRs, fuses or circuit protectors, surge-limiting resistors, cables, and/or mechanical mounting hardware to create an "axe" or "crowbar" circuit which would short the output, in the event of regulator failure, to protect the load. Many problems existed with that method:
1. High instantaneous currents. typically greater than 100

A and as much

as 1000 A, are commonly seen. Large components are

required, switching noise can cause other circuit problems,

and upstream components can be damaged unless surge-limiting

resistors are used.
2. Whenever an over-voltage fault is detected, the axe fires

and usually blows an upstream fuse, requiring replacement.
3. SCR circuits sre typically sensitive to nuisance triggers

caused by ambient noise, making reliable operation a

problem.
4. Additional cabling, bus bar...