Browse Prior Art Database

I/O Keyboard Switching of Keys from Typmatic to a Non-Typmatic Status

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049261D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Motola, PD: AUTHOR

Abstract

In display terminal keyboard entry, a system has been developed wherein, in addition to its native or basic operation, the terminal may be used to emulate other terminals so that the terminal may be used as an I/O device to a variety of host CPUs (central processing units). In carrying out such switching, it is necessary that functions represented by the keyboard also be switched. In some cases, situations have arisen wherein a particular key represents the same function for two different terminals being switched one to the other. However, the identical key may be required to be typamatic on one terminal and non-typamatic on the other. Typamatic means that the continued depression of the particular key will result in the repetitive character being printed.

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I/O Keyboard Switching of Keys from Typmatic to a Non-Typmatic Status

In display terminal keyboard entry, a system has been developed wherein, in addition to its native or basic operation, the terminal may be used to emulate other terminals so that the terminal may be used as an I/O device to a variety of host CPUs (central processing units). In carrying out such switching, it is necessary that functions represented by the keyboard also be switched. In some cases, situations have arisen wherein a particular key represents the same function for two different terminals being switched one to the other. However, the identical key may be required to be typamatic on one terminal and non-typamatic on the other. Typamatic means that the continued depression of the particular key will result in the repetitive character being printed. An example of this would be a tab or carriage return key which is typically typamatic on a data processing terminal and not typamatic on a word processing terminal.

In such a situation with the expedient of suitable supporting software, even though the function appears to be identical to the keyboard operator, a particular key may become typamatic in order to fulfill its function on one terminal and non- typamatic in order to fulfill its function on another terminal.

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