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Curved Track Feeding Using a Linear Drive

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049271D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Haboian, H: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The problem of obtaining a curved feeding path for small parts has required, in the past, a complicated mechanical mechanism which is invariably expensive. The mechanism to obtain a curved path feeding of parts is shown in the plan view of Fig. 1. The top sections 14, 15 and 16 of the linear feed drive 10 have to be sufficiently wide to accommodate the curved track 12. A standard in-line feeder 10 can be used with a proper short, wide section 14 connected to the top thereof. The track 12 is formed in the central straight section 14 and the angled sections 15 and 16 at each end of the center section, respectively. Thus, the linear feed drive 10, driving in the direction indicated in Fig. 1, will give small parts (not shown) in the track 12 the motion, as indicated by the input arrow and output arrow.

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Curved Track Feeding Using a Linear Drive

The problem of obtaining a curved feeding path for small parts has required, in the past, a complicated mechanical mechanism which is invariably expensive. The mechanism to obtain a curved path feeding of parts is shown in the plan view of Fig. 1. The top sections 14, 15 and 16 of the linear feed drive 10 have to be sufficiently wide to accommodate the curved track 12. A standard in-line feeder 10 can be used with a proper short, wide section 14 connected to the top thereof. The track 12 is formed in the central straight section 14 and the angled sections 15 and 16 at each end of the center section, respectively. Thus, the linear feed drive 10, driving in the direction indicated in Fig. 1, will give small parts (not shown) in the track 12 the motion, as indicated by the input arrow and output arrow. The track curvature, as shown in Fig. 1, is approximately 90(degrees), but the arrangement is capable of moving parts along a 120 (degree) curved path. Fig. 2 is a side view of Fig. 1, indicating g that the track 12 is sunk in the track forming sections 14, 15 and 16.

A schematic representation of a linear vibrator or feeder drive is shown in Fig.
3. The base 20 has spring metal elements 21 extending up therefrom, upon which are mounted the track sections 14, 15 and 16. The vibration is induced in the spring members 21 by the electromagnetic unit 22. The high frequency of vibration causes the parts (not shown) carried in the t...