Browse Prior Art Database

Voice Response for Data Processing Equipment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049277D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 4 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Crauwels, GL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This device provides control and interfacing of a voice response (VR) device with data processing equipment and features discrimination of inter (syllabic/word) quiet versus true quiet in human speech for efficient use of mass storage. The VR device is shown in Figs. 1-3. It is an input/output (I/O) port that enables a data processing system to record and reproduce the human voice. Figs. 4 and 5 illustrate human speech waveforms. A VR device digitizes the human voice so that it can be stored on disk or some other digital storage device; it will also reproduce the original voice from stored digital data.

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Voice Response for Data Processing Equipment

This device provides control and interfacing of a voice response (VR) device with data processing equipment and features discrimination of inter (syllabic/word) quiet versus true quiet in human speech for efficient use of mass storage. The VR device is shown in Figs. 1-3. It is an input/output (I/O) port that enables a data processing system to record and reproduce the human voice. Figs. 4 and 5 illustrate human speech waveforms. A VR device digitizes the human voice so that it can be stored on disk or some other digital storage device; it will also reproduce the original voice from stored digital data. To perform these functions efficiently it must be under control of the data processing (DP) equipment, signal the DP equipment of the analog voice input status and make automatic internal adjustments to the coding circuitry to compensate for the large dynamic range of human speech.

Fig. 1 shows the I/O lines for handshaking between the DP equipment (not shown) and C0DEC (coder/decoder) 1. The analog I/O lines 8 and 9 interface to the audio transducers (i.e., telephone, tape recorder).

Digital Voice Data In on line 2 carries the serial digital input from mass storage to the CODEC. Data is passed to the CODEC synchronously with the CODEC clock on line 10. The Transmit/Receive line 4 selects audio out decode for transmit or audio in (code) for receive. Enable CODEC line 5 carries a control signal which selects either forced quiet, to be explained further on, or allows normal coding/ decoding to occur.

During the transmit (decode) operation, when audio out is required, digital voice data is inputted at 2, line 4 is selected for Transmit. When CODEC line 5 is enabled, the device will immediately begin to output audio signals on lines 8.

Receive operation (coding) requires that transmit/receive line 4 be in the Receive mode and analog voice data present on lines 9. When the CODEC is enabled by line 5, digital voice data will appear on line 3 synchronously with the clock 10. The special features Non-quiet on line 7 and Suppress Quiet During Receive on line 6 will be discussed further in connection with Figs. 4 and 5.

The system utilizes an audio input/output coder/decoder (A I/O CODEC) communications industry device. This is a device of mixed analog and digital circuitry capable of quantizing in time, i.e., coding audio voice signals. The resulting CODEC output is a digitized stream of ones and zeroes that contains all the coded information necessary to recreate (decode) the original audio signal.

Decoding is accomplished by using the same circuitry used in the coding process. In its basic configuration. the CODEC can be represented by the block diagram of Fig. 2. This particular CODEC is intended to be used in a telephone application.

Audio (analog) signals on the Phone Input line are passed through a filter buffer network 11 that terminates the input signal, adjusts the level by amplification...