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Microfluorescence Line Width Measurement

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049291D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fahey, TF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This line-width measurement technique utilizes the fluorescence characteristics of organic materials, such as photoresist, to provide improved measurement accuracy by the elimination of light dispersion effects inherently associated with incident light optics.

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Microfluorescence Line Width Measurement

This line-width measurement technique utilizes the fluorescence characteristics of organic materials, such as photoresist, to provide improved measurement accuracy by the elimination of light dispersion effects inherently associated with incident light optics.

Fluorescence microscopy has the ability to sharply define an organic film edge, thus greatly decreasing the amount of measurement error normally caused by light dispersion at the edges of an image. With this technique, the organic film- containing substrate is exposed to the short wavelength (390-490 nm) range of the light spectrum. The resulting generated light which is received by the viewing optics is in the 510-600 nm range. This mechanism yields a very sharp contrast between the edge of the fluorescing image and the black non-fluorescing background. Because of the enhanced edge portion of the image, a more accurate measurement is obtainable.

There are a number of possible systems one can use to apply microfluorescence measurement techniques which range from a simple filar eyepiece to sophisticated image-analysis systems. Applications may be extended to any system in which a fluorescing material and a non-fluorescing material are present, particularly where a low contrast incident light image would be produced, such as when an extremely thin film of organic material is present on a object.

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