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Combination Component Standoff and Carrier

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049296D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Weiss, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Small electronic components, such as ceramic capacitors, are sometimes difficult to handle and orient so that they can be soldered to a printed circuit board. Ceramic capacitors are required to be directly attached by soldering to the surface of a printed circuit board. By soldering directly, an inductive path is shortened or eliminated, thus making the capacitor operate more effectively. Other components may be surface-soldered for different reasons.

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Combination Component Standoff and Carrier

Small electronic components, such as ceramic capacitors, are sometimes difficult to handle and orient so that they can be soldered to a printed circuit board. Ceramic capacitors are required to be directly attached by soldering to the surface of a printed circuit board. By soldering directly, an inductive path is shortened or eliminated, thus making the capacitor operate more effectively. Other components may be surface-soldered for different reasons.

Surface soldering components on printed circuit boards presents several problems:
1. Since there is no pin-in-hole location system, it may be

difficult to orient and secure the component during soldering.
2. Coefficient of thermal expansion mismatches between the

component and the board may require a minimum thickness

solder such that temperature excursions do not cause excessive

joint strains.
3. In the case of flat ceramic capacitors, as with other

similarly shapen devices, a

method must be supplied to stand the component off the

board surface in order to effectively clear the

area of flux residues after soldering.

The above problems can be overcome by having the component devices connected in series along a pair of suitable diameter wires, as shown. The devices are to be soldered to the wires and appropriately spaced for individual or group application to the board. The wires shall be of printed circuit board compatible material, such as tinned copper, and may be nicked...