Browse Prior Art Database

Laser Sizing of Green MLC Laminates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049327D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 3 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chiaiese, VC: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Laser cutting quickly and accurately separates (sizing) individual substrates from green multilayer ceramic (MLC) laminates. A laminate can consist of 10-33 individually perforated and wired ceramic green sheets which have been aligned, stacked and laminated with approximately 4500 psi. The laminates are 166 MM square, 0.038"-0.270" thick depending on the number of layers, and contain from 1 to 16 substrates.

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Laser Sizing of Green MLC Laminates

Laser cutting quickly and accurately separates (sizing) individual substrates from green multilayer ceramic (MLC) laminates. A laminate can consist of 10-33 individually perforated and wired ceramic green sheets which have been aligned, stacked and laminated with approximately 4500 psi. The laminates are 166 MM square, 0.038"-0.270" thick depending on the number of layers, and contain from 1 to 16 substrates.

Cutting is achieved with a 1,200-watt CO(2) circulating gas laser which continuously discharges infrared (IR) laser radiation at a wavelength of 10.6 micrometers. The laser beam is directed into a stainless steel cutting cavity and vacuum chuck assembly which is mounted on an X,Y and theta motion table. A laminate is mounted on the vacuum chuck assembly, and the X,Y, and theta motion table is indexed in a complex pattern under the laser beam. This results in the laser beam separating ceramic material from around each substrate in the laminate. The laminate residue falls to the bottom of the cutting cavity, and the individual substrates are removed from the vacuum chuck.

The system, as shown in the drawing, is comprised of a laser beam produced in an axial flow cavity by passing a nitrogen, helium, CO(2), and oxygen gas mixture through an electric arc 1. Mirrors positioned at both ends of the arc provide the optical feedback necessary to support lasering at 2. After seven passes through the charged gas mixture, the laser beam exits the cavity through an optical coupler 3. The beam can be sampled at this point by rotating reflective blades which direct a 3 percent sample to a calibrated thermopile 4. This thermopile measures the amount of power in the laser beam. The laser is on all the time, but the beam is used only when cutting is required. The shutter is prevents the...