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Photolithographic Method of Applying Secondary Geometries to an Exposed Photoplate to Precise Tolerances

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049348D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Farrett, WD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Described is a process for producing photo-plates which minimizes the amount of raw plates required to produce a master having improved location tolerance of primary to secondary imagery.

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Photolithographic Method of Applying Secondary Geometries to an Exposed Photoplate to Precise Tolerances

Described is a process for producing photo-plates which minimizes the amount of raw plates required to produce a master having improved location tolerance of primary to secondary imagery.

A photomask is stepped on a photorepeater producing geometries (chip imagery) and primary alignment targets on Plate #1 (Fig. 1).

The plate is then immersed in a developing solution to partially develop the images in the emulsion so they are discernable under a microscope. (The partial development is done so that the emulsion can be re-exposed.)

Plate #1 is then placed in an alignment fixture (emulsion side up). Plate #2 containing secondary geometries and targets (not readily produced by step and repeat) is placed emulsion side down in the upper portion of the two-piece alignment fixture. The targets (secondary) on Plate #2 are precisely aligned to the targets (primary) on Plate #1 using a microscope (Fig. 2).

The secondary geometries are transferred from Plate #1 to Plate #2 by light exposure (primary and secondary geometries merged). Plate #1 is fully developed which produces a glass plate containing both primary and secondary geometries (Fig. 3).

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