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Clock Calculator with Pacer Function

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049392D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Panto, TA: AUTHOR

Abstract

A hand held clock-calculator is provided with a pacer function. A user enters a unit of distance that is to be traveled in a unit of time. The increment of distance is added to the display value at the increments of time. The user can compare the display with a reference, such as mileage markers or an automobile odometer.

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Clock Calculator with Pacer Function

A hand held clock-calculator is provided with a pacer function. A user enters a unit of distance that is to be traveled in a unit of time. The increment of distance is added to the display value at the increments of time. The user can compare the display with a reference, such as mileage markers or an automobile odometer.

The apparatus of the drawing is similar to a clock-calculator. Suppose for example that a person wants to drive an automobile at a pace of 50 miles per hour while varying the instantaneous speed. The user enters the present odometer reading in the display register 2 and enters the increment of distance,
0.1 in this example, into a register 3. For this pacer operation, the display should be incremented by 0.1 mile each 7.2 seconds, and for the example in which an oscillator 4 supplies pulses at the rate of 10 per second, the count is 72 during this interval. Either the user or the pacer calculates this value and enters it into a register 5 where it is saved. This value is loaded into a counter register 6, and when a switch for a start signal 7 is closed, the oscillator pulses are gated to decrement the counter. When the count reaches zero, a signal on a line from register 3 causes an adder 9 to add 0.1 from register 3 to the display count in register 2 and thereby increment the count of display 8. This signal also reloads the count in register 5 into register 6 to continue the operation of the pacer.

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