Browse Prior Art Database

Multilayer Ceramic Module with Power Distribution System for Simplified Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049395D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Askin, HO: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

A multilayer circuit module has a layer of metal lines that connect to components, such as diodes and transistors, on a silicon chip. Some of these lines are connected by vias to metal patterns in other layers that provide power. In this circuit design system, points where interconnecting vias can be located are flagged. A program compares flag locations on the two layers for each voltage and identifies points where vias can be conveniently located.

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Multilayer Ceramic Module with Power Distribution System for Simplified Design

A multilayer circuit module has a layer of metal lines that connect to components, such as diodes and transistors, on a silicon chip. Some of these lines are connected by vias to metal patterns in other layers that provide power. In this circuit design system, points where interconnecting vias can be located are flagged.

A program compares flag locations on the two layers for each voltage and identifies points where vias can be conveniently located.

A large-scale integration circuit device may contain several circuit elements that require different voltages. Thousands of vias may be required for power distribution. This system provides a simplified design technique for selecting the position of these vias.

The drawing shows a metal pattern that supplies two voltage levels to the chip. Circuit primitives, such as a PLA, are located along the power distribution metal patterns. A collection of primitives operating at various voltage levels makes up a functional circuit, such as an adder, that is called a macro. A flag is located at each point where a via may be connected. These flags can be physically printed on circuit diagrams and/or on the actual metal patterns for inspection, and they are represented by coordinate points in a program that assigns via locations. The program matches the via locations with power distribution conductors in an overlying layer of the module.

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