Browse Prior Art Database

Cross-Point Connector Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049403D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Uberbacher, EC: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a low-cost cross-point connector interface h which can be used for a minimum configuration without cost penalty. The interface includes a plastic grid with a matrix of square tunnels. Connector strips, which are secured to the printed circuit boards to be connected, have contact-carrying bosses which are inserted into the plastic grid from opposite sides.

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Cross-Point Connector Interface

This article describes a low-cost cross-point connector interface h which can be used for a minimum configuration without cost penalty. The interface includes a plastic grid with a matrix of square tunnels. Connector strips, which are secured to the printed circuit boards to be connected, have contact-carrying bosses which are inserted into the plastic grid from opposite sides.

Referring to Fig. 1, the plastic grid 10 can have a matrix of 64 (8x8) square tunnels 12 which extend completely through the grid. As shown in Fig. 2, each tunnel 12 may have outwardly beveled throats 14. These facilitate the insertion of bosses on connector strips, such as strips 16 and 18 shown in Fig. 1. The strips 16 and 18 are secured to the edges of printed circuit cards 20 and 22, respectively, which are oriented at right angles to one another. Each of the connector strips 16 and 18 includes a number of protruding square bosses 24. The square bosses contain hermaphroditic connectors (not shown). One example of a suitable connector is the serpent contact disclosed in U.S. Patent 3,208,030.

Referring to Fig. 3, which is a partial view of one connector strip, the strip includes drilled tabs 26 and 28 which permit the strip to be securely attached to a printed circuit board. As is shown only in Fig. 3, each of the bosses 24 is flanked by staggered ears 30 which mesh with similar ears on an opposing connector strip. Each of the bosses 24 is shown with a matrix of nine (3x3) openings 32 from which the hermaphroditic connectors would protrude. The edges of the openings are canted at a 45 degree angle relative to the upper and lower edges of the connector strip. The hermaphrod...