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Multi-Destination Routing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049502D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bharath-Kumar, K: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Herein, the notion of multi-destination routing is formulated, and the protocols to support it are given below. Specifically, an algorithm for multi-destination routing, called Direct Path Routing, which provides service that is far superior to a straightforward method, called the Naive Routing, is described. 1. Introduction

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Multi-Destination Routing

Herein, the notion of multi-destination routing is formulated, and the protocols to support it are given below. Specifically, an algorithm for multi- destination routing, called Direct Path Routing, which provides service that is far superior to a straightforward method, called the Naive Routing, is described. 1. Introduction

In computer networks, messages are routed from source nodes to destination nodes using routing tables. A typical routing table at a node specifies the next node on the shortest path to each destination. When transferring a file to multiple destinations, the naive approach in networks such as system network architecture (SNA) is to send multiple copies, one to each destination.

An addressing structure and a simple algorithm are described that exploit the structure to obtain far better performance than the naive algorithm.
2. Addressing Structure

The addressing structure proposed is:

Code, # Dest, Destination List where Code specifies the type of routing scheme (regular, multi destination, etc.), Dest specifies the number of destinations, and Destination List specifies the actual destination list.
3. Direct Path Algorithm

The following algorithm is appropriate at a given node for routing to multiple destinations:
a. For each destination in the destination list, determine the next node on the shortest path, using the routing table.
b. For each next node, N, chosen in Step 1, let d(1), ..., d(kn)

be the destination for...