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Insertion of New Columns and Special Handling Rules for Columns with No Gutter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049514D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 3 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Horn, GR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of column insertion on word processing display units when a table has been previously defined via a column layout operation. The method allows an operator to create a new column for a table independently from the table itself, and then handle the insertion of the new column into the table proper.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

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Insertion of New Columns and Special Handling Rules for Columns with No Gutter

Disclosed is a method of column insertion on word processing display units when a table has been previously defined via a column layout operation. The method allows an operator to create a new column for a table independently from the table itself, and then handle the insertion of the new column into the table proper.

Also disclosed is a method designed to alleviate various problems associated with the deletion, movement, or copying of existing columns in a table wherein the first column has a gutter width of zero.

To insert a column in a table as defined above, the operator must position an operating cursor anywhere on the first column entry of the column prior to which the new column is to be inserted. However, if the new column is to be inserted as the "last" column, then the cursor should be positioned on the first line of the table such that a ghost cursor of the scale line is to the right of the last column. The ghost cursor is used to indicate an exact operating position along a line, whereas the operating cursor indicates an operating point along a line. For many operations, both are vertically aligned. In the cases such as insertion of a new column in the last column of a table, though, vertical alignment is not maintained.

The following is an example of the insertion of a new column between two columns of numbers. (see original)

Insertion is commenced by placing the cursor anywhere in the first entry of column three, indicating the new column will be inserted just prior to column three. When a column key is pressed, the system verifies the cursor is on the first line of a table and then prompts the operator to select column insertion or revision operation. Pressing the column key again causes the system to scan the first line of the table to determine, via character escapement, the column that is cursored. Then it builds a column example line and positions the cursor on the column example line at a point equal to the "left" margin of the cursored column. The "left" margin is the first character of the column gutter (the space just to the left of the column) and is the point where the new column is defined. This enables the operator to know with certainty where the new column will be defined upon keying the new column during a column layout operation.

To begin revising the column example line, the cursor is placed in the position where the new column is to start and the operator types an example for the new column on the column example line. In the example below, the new column represented by "o's" has been typed in and an automatic inter-column spacing function has been performed to evenly space the new and old columns. (see original)

When finished, the enter key is pressed, and an empty "system page" with the tab rack and column width previously specified on the column example line is presented to the operator. The operator then creates the c...