Browse Prior Art Database

Enhanced Bevel Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049575D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Garroux, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In order to measure the depth of the defect-free zone of semiconductor wafers, a new technique, based both on the idea of protecting the surface to be characterized and on the design of an improved mounting block for receiving the wafers, will be described below.

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Enhanced Bevel Technique

In order to measure the depth of the defect-free zone of semiconductor wafers, a new technique, based both on the idea of protecting the surface to be characterized and on the design of an improved mounting block for receiving the wafers, will be described below.

In the modern semiconductor industry many precise measurements have to be made to control the surface quality of the wafers either on the back side to define the depth of defects to be introduced for gettering purposes or on the active face to insure that a defect free zone of at least 3 microns is maintained throughout the semiconductor processing. It has been widely recognized that the final yields are strongly dependent on the wafer quality parameters, among which the defect free zone is a key factor.

The wafer is broken in two, and one of the samples is mounted onto a metal mounting block and then sealed by wax. Polishing is carried out using a rotating disc polisher according to the standard chem-mech techniques. Since the material in the neighbourhood of any defect is removed faster, cracks are emphasized and become apparent.

However, these methods have some well known disadvantages. Bad reproducibility of the angle. The edge of the bevel

is not well delimitated, and consequently the method

is inaccurate (error of about 5 microns),

Low productivity since the standard beveling methods are

generally applied to a small sample with laboratory tools.

Disclosed herein is a new me...