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Fibre-Optic Transmission System with Bypassable Repeaters

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049617D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Abramson, P: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the case of electrical communication systems, when the distance to be traversed exceeds the maximum distance permitted by the communication system for reasons of attenuation, jitter, or any other limiting factor, a repeater is inserted into the system. For very long distances, a plurality of repeaters may be utilized. It is obvious that the failure of any repeater would completely disrupt the system. For the case where the transmission is over a pair of copper wires or a coaxial cable, the problem of the failure of a repeater is solved by connecting a relay across the input and output of the repeater. This relay effectively bypasses the failed repeater and the system remains operative. Of course, the distance between repeaters must be less than half the maximum distance permitted for reasons of attenuation, etc.

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Fibre-Optic Transmission System with Bypassable Repeaters

In the case of electrical communication systems, when the distance to be traversed exceeds the maximum distance permitted by the communication system for reasons of attenuation, jitter, or any other limiting factor, a repeater is inserted into the system. For very long distances, a plurality of repeaters may be utilized. It is obvious that the failure of any repeater would completely disrupt the system. For the case where the transmission is over a pair of copper wires or a coaxial cable, the problem of the failure of a repeater is solved by connecting a relay across the input and output of the repeater. This relay effectively bypasses the failed repeater and the system remains operative. Of course, the distance between repeaters must be less than half the maximum distance permitted for reasons of attenuation, etc.

For the case of optical fiber communication systems, all of the reasoning described above is still pertinent, except that there is no practical optical relay or other device which may be used to bypass a failed repeater. As a result, a single failure which knocks out one repeater will cause the entire system to go down. This article describes a method of bypassing a failed repeater which is suitable for use with fiber optic transmission mediums.

The figure is a diagram of one implementation of the method. Basically, what is proposed is that each transmitting light emitting diode (LED) launch its light (which contains the data to be transmitted) into two optical fibers instead of one. This may also be accomplished by the use of an optical...