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Laser Fused Thick Film Circuit Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049632D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Keen, RG: AUTHOR

Abstract

Thick film circuit printing is accomplished by laser fusing dry powder solids to a substrate, without the use of a binder material with the powder solids. During printing the powder solids are held in place on the substrate by an electrostatic field, which is maintained while the desired pattern is fused by laser onto the substrate. After fusing, the electrical charge is neutralized, allowing the excess powder to drop away in its unchanged form for reuse.

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Laser Fused Thick Film Circuit Printing

Thick film circuit printing is accomplished by laser fusing dry powder solids to a substrate, without the use of a binder material with the powder solids. During printing the powder solids are held in place on the substrate by an electrostatic field, which is maintained while the desired pattern is fused by laser onto the substrate. After fusing, the electrical charge is neutralized, allowing the excess powder to drop away in its unchanged form for reuse.

Screen printing has been used previously for the manufacture of thick film hybrid patterns on ceramic or porcelain on steel substrates. The resolution and repeatability of that screen printing technology is limited by the screen mesh size, paste composition, and correct adjustment and operation of the printing equipment. These factors limit the minimum feature size, and in the case of printed resistors, resistance value accuracy which may be produced. After printing, this technique requires the removal of the excess paste material and recovery of the excess solids of the paste for recycling.

With the present technique the resolution and repeatability of a computer numerically controlled laser is significantly greater than is achieved with screen printing. Since no binder is used with the powder printing material, the recycling of the excess printing material involves no more than vacuuming up the unfused powder material after the electrostatic field is removed following la...