Browse Prior Art Database

Progressive Visibility Function for a Display Station Cursor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049639D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Day, MN: AUTHOR

Abstract

With the increasing density of information being presented on a display station screen, the cursor is becoming harder for the operator to see. Some display stations resolve this by using a large cursor (such as character reverse image or a "blob"), but the large cursor approach causes too much distraction for the operator during keying. The approach described herein provides a cursor which becomes more visible when a pause or interruption in typing occurs but is nondistractive during normal keying.

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Progressive Visibility Function for a Display Station Cursor

With the increasing density of information being presented on a display station screen, the cursor is becoming harder for the operator to see. Some display stations resolve this by using a large cursor (such as character reverse image or a "blob"), but the large cursor approach causes too much distraction for the operator during keying. The approach described herein provides a cursor which becomes more visible when a pause or interruption in typing occurs but is nondistractive during normal keying.

The progressive visibility function causes the cursor to appear as a normal character underscore on the screen as an operator is keying. However when keying has stopped for a predefined period of time (1 second), the display overlays the cursored character with a "cursor mask". This cursor mask may be specified to be "ORed", "ANDed", or "exclusive-ORed with the cursored character. For example, the cursor mask may be implemented as a "box" outlining the character position which is "ORed" with the cursored character. This causes a box to be drawn around the character after keying has stopped. The display blinks the box around the character while highlighting the character and box if keying remains stopped for an additional predefined period of time (2 seconds). This blink is an asymmetric blink (i.e., the box is "on" longer than it is "off"). This kind of blink has been found to be a much more soothing blink th...