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Interferometric Measurement Of Local Temperature Changes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049733D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kaus, G: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Irradiation-induced local temperature changes of a sample are interferometrically measured, taking advantage of the thermally produced local deformation of the sample.

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Interferometric Measurement Of Local Temperature Changes

Irradiation-induced local temperature changes of a sample are interferometrically measured, taking advantage of the thermally produced local deformation of the sample.

Local heating of a sample, for example, by means of an electron beam, causes a bulge where the beam hits the sample surface. Two mono chromatic light beams, produced, for example, from a laser beam by a birefringent crystal and reflected at the top of the bulge and the bulge-free surface, have a phase difference Phi. This phase difference is linearly dependent upon the energy flux. The figure shows the phase difference versus the energy flux for a sample consisting of a 4OO (mu)m thick Si wafer and a 2.5 (mu)m thick Al layer on top of it (curve 1) and for a sample consisting of a reflecting 4 mm thick metal sheet (curve 2). In this case, the energy flux is directly proportional to the temperature change which can be determined from the linear relation between the temperature and the phase difference Phi. For any other structured samples, the temperature is determined from the measured phase difference phi, using a calibration curve.

The phase difference for a given temperature change is particularly pronounced for samples consisting of one or several thermally conductive films deposited on a substrate of poor thermal conductivity.

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