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Message Compression with Human Readable Abbreviations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049749D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 3 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Howell, DM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The use of abbreviations for long-distance communication conserves time and transmission facilities. To aid maintenance the abbreviations used here are recognizable by humans as such, so that garble can be distinguished from valid messages. Data words identical with abbreviations are sent with unique designations which are recognized and removed at the receiver.

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Message Compression with Human Readable Abbreviations

The use of abbreviations for long-distance communication conserves time and transmission facilities. To aid maintenance the abbreviations used here are recognizable by humans as such, so that garble can be distinguished from valid messages. Data words identical with abbreviations are sent with unique designations which are recognized and removed at the receiver.

Standard or common abbreviations are used for a large number, for example, 5000, of the most used words. Typically, these abbreviations are formed by eliminating vowels and less prominent consonants. Persons normally can recognize such abbreviation after only minimal familiarization with them. In addition to the abbreviations for all messages, additional, job-oriented lists could be added. They would have to be identified in a header preceding the document, and the receiver must have the specialized list.

Fig. 1 shows the first three abbreviations in a typical general list, including several variations in form achieved by suffixes. Thus, ABS is the abbreviation for ABSOLUTE, and ADM is the abbreviation for ADMINISTRATE. The suffix T is added for "tion" or noun form. Thus, ADMINISTRATION is abbreviated ADMT. S is added for plural, so ABSOLUTES is abbreviated ABSS. D is added for past tense, so ADMINISTRATED is abbreviated ADMD. In the specific system described, abbreviations are limited to being four or less characters. This is an optional feature in that it permits logic which excludes longer words from the possibility of being abbreviations.

A typical word processing system is illustrated in Fig. 2. The processor is driven by a program stored in program memory and in turn provides signals on the Address Bus, as required, and receives from and provides data to the Data Bus under program control. The text being keyed by the typist is stored in document memory for editing purposes. A background program takes a word at a time from document memory and processes it utilizing the routine shown in Fig. 3A, placing the results in the commo buffer where they are stored temporarily until sent to the communications line via the communications (commo) I/O unit shown in Fig. 2.

On receiving the data sent as described above, via the communications I/O, a program stores the words temporarily in the communications buffer after which the document is analyzed a word at a time in accordance with Fig. 3B and the results are stored in document memory. Finally, under command from the typist the document may be printed out via the printer I/O.

Logic Operation

The logic of Fig. 3A provides the compression of words into human readable abbreviated forms. A word is received from document memory, and at decision "1" the logic determines whether the word is in the abbreviation word list. If the decision is yes, the word is replaced...