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Process for Local Toughening of Expanded PTFE Insulation for Cable

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049764D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Washo, BD: AUTHOR

Abstract

Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) insulation is toughened at the end of an electrical cable by a process that includes (1) applying a low molecular weight PTFE-like liquid fluorocarbon telomer resin to the area to be toughened and (2) heating the electrical conductor to fuse the PTFE and the resin. In the heating step, a radio frequency (RF) heater heats the metal conductor, which in turn heats the expanded PTFE and the resin. In the heated region, the cellular structure of the PTFE collapses and melts together with the resin to form a fused matrix. The process improves both the mechanical strength and the dielectric strength of the insulation.

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Process for Local Toughening of Expanded PTFE Insulation for Cable

Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) insulation is toughened at the end of an electrical cable by a process that includes (1) applying a low molecular weight PTFE-like liquid fluorocarbon telomer resin to the area to be toughened and (2) heating the electrical conductor to fuse the PTFE and the resin. In the heating step, a radio frequency (RF) heater heats the metal conductor, which in turn heats the expanded PTFE and the resin. In the heated region, the cellular structure of the PTFE collapses and melts together with the resin to form a fused matrix. The process improves both the mechanical strength and the dielectric strength of the insulation.

Expanded PTFE insulation has air voids that reduce the effective dielectric constant of the material and thereby increase the speed that an electrical signal travels along the cable. However, the mechanical properties of the material degrade as a function of the square of the decrease in density, and the insulation may be subject to cold flow which can cause short circuits at the end of a cable.

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