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Move and Copy Commands for Text Processing System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049842D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 4 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clowes, T: AUTHOR

Abstract

Some current text processors have Column Move and Copy commands that require the lines into which the column is to be inserted (the target) to be exactly the same as the lines from which the column is to be moved/copied, or completely separate. That is, in general there cannot be a partial overlap of the source and target lines. The commands to be described allow partial overlap of the source and target lines.

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Move and Copy Commands for Text Processing System

Some current text processors have Column Move and Copy commands that require the lines into which the column is to be inserted (the target) to be exactly the same as the lines from which the column is to be moved/copied, or completely separate. That is, in general there cannot be a partial overlap of the source and target lines. The commands to be described allow partial overlap of the source and target lines.

The operation of the function is conceptually as follows:
1. The source block or rectangle (excluding line ends) is removed

from its position, and if the operation is MOVE,

it is replaced by nulls.
2. The insertion is made at the position indicated, treating

nulls as significant.
3. The text is propagated in the normal way, removing any

nulls not required.

Some preliminary design environment and dependencies need to be described. On the text system the top left corner position and bottom right corner position of the source column are called pointing 1 and pointing 2, respectively. The target point is called pointing 3 (ptg 3). When pointing 3 is made with the ENTER key, the source column is inserted within the existing set of lines. whereas with the block insert (BLK INS) key, the text is split at the target point and a set of new lines created.

The manipulation of text is done on a complete line basis, and one line at a time is processed in both the source and target environments. The resulting text produced by the use of the function cannot replace the original text until the operation is nearing completion, so that the system can recover a valid workstore if the system fails. Consequently, replacement chains of blocks of workstore are built up for both the source and target parts of the document.

One of the main problems to recognize in implementing this function is that when processing a given line which is involved in both source and target rectangles, the original format of the line must be available when identifying and removing the source text and when locating the position of the target segment. This is because, for example, when text is removed from a line the correct format for the result cannot be obtained simply by adjusting by e constant, as the action of centering and decimal tabs and temporary left margins (TLMs), in particular, cause irregular shifting.

There is a formatting function which can format a line of text according to how it should appear if it were displayed, e.g., taking account of tabbing, TLMs, etc. There is a propagation function which rearranges text in workstore into lines of the correct length for subsequent display and processing. During its processing it removes null characters.

The method is as follows:
1. First determine, by scanning workstore if necessary,

whether source and target will overlap and the

1

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page and line numbers involved.

(This is not strictly necessary but is useful in initializing

control information).
2. For...