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Browse Prior Art Database

Gelatin Cure Status Determination by Light Section Microscopy

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049945D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sincerbox, GT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A technique to determine the cure status of Hardened Dichrometed Gelatin (HDG) using light section microscopy (LSM) is described.

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Gelatin Cure Status Determination by Light Section Microscopy

A technique to determine the cure status of Hardened Dichrometed Gelatin (HDG) using light section microscopy (LSM) is described.

HDG is the preferred material for recording efficient phase-volume holograms in thin layers. In marked contrast to other recording materials, near-unity diffraction efficiences are possible in films as thin as 5 micrometers. However, close control is required over the process variables during the preparation process since it is known that to produce high quality holograms some curing of the HDG is required prior to recording.

LSM can be used in the characterization of cured gelatin films, and this non- contacting, optical method permits direct observation of three important film parameters, namely, swell ratio, presence or absence of a gelatin/ water interface, and surface deformation during drying. From these variables and prior knowledge developed to determine the limits on these variables which produce suitable holograms, cure status of the HDG can be determined.

For example, a relatively fresh (uncured) film would have a large swell ratio (>4:1) when soaked in water, and would dry with noticeable surface reticulation. This film would be unsuitable for producing holograms since the surface reticulation would contribute to high noise in the hologram. A sufficiently cured film always develops a gelatin/ surface water interface, i.e., the gelatin is hard enough not to be dis...