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Browse Prior Art Database

Magnetic Disk Buffing Enhancement

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049947D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gruber, LW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

To facilitate a consistently stable characterization of the magnetic disk buffing process for all coated disk surfaces, a consistent relationship of independent variables subjected to linear tape and coated disk surface velocities under confined imprint-pressured disk surface areas can be achieved by the implementation of a conically formed elastic pressure roller arrangement in the present buffer assemblies. Present magnetic disk buffing process technology uses a cylindrical elastic pressure roller for controlling the buffing tape displacement through the imprint contacting surface of a coated, spinning disk. Referring to Fig.

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Magnetic Disk Buffing Enhancement

To facilitate a consistently stable characterization of the magnetic disk buffing process for all coated disk surfaces, a consistent relationship of independent variables subjected to linear tape and coated disk surface velocities under confined imprint-pressured disk surface areas can be achieved by the implementation of a conically formed elastic pressure roller arrangement in the present buffer assemblies. Present magnetic disk buffing process technology uses a cylindrical elastic pressure roller for controlling the buffing tape displacement through the imprint contacting surface of a coated, spinning disk. Referring to Fig. 1, three imprint patterns can be generated by end load conditions of the roller cylinder, such as rectangular (A), equal end loads; trapezoidal (B), unequal loads with the heavier load at the disk perimeter; and trapezoidal (C), unequal loads with the heavier load at the inside radial coated surface area of the disk. Any deviations in end loadings and roller durometer (due to thermal heating) will affect the surface imprint pattern which can produce unstable buff parameters.

In comparing the tangential surface velocities at the inner and outer imprint boundaries of the disk, a discrete proportionality exists regardless of spindle speed. With constant linear velocity of the buffing tape on the pressure roller, a net velocity differential must exist at the outer edges of the buffing tape as it passes through the imprint...