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Room Temperature Optical Frequency Domain Memory System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049948D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Alvarez, DC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A memory system for storing information in the frequency domain at room temperature involves the use of an Alpha diketone/ polymer host material system. A specific example is 3 percent biacetyl (BA) in polyemthylmethacrylate (PMMA). Exposure of this material system to a Kr/+/ or Ar/+/ laser line decreases the overall BA absorption. But in the wavelength region of the laser line this absorption decrease is less than in other areas. The net result is an absorption line with spikes at the laser irradiation frequencies. These spikes can be used to store information in the frequency domain.

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Room Temperature Optical Frequency Domain Memory System

A memory system for storing information in the frequency domain at room temperature involves the use of an Alpha diketone/ polymer host material system. A specific example is 3 percent biacetyl (BA) in polyemthylmethacrylate (PMMA). Exposure of this material system to a Kr/+/ or Ar/+/ laser line decreases the overall BA absorption. But in the wavelength region of the laser line this absorption decrease is less than in other areas. The net result is an absorption line with spikes at the laser irradiation frequencies. These spikes can be used to store information in the frequency domain.

The major advantage of this system is that the information being stored is stable at room temperatures, whereas conventional photochemical hole burning memory systems require that the sample be kept at temperatures below 10K in order to be stable.

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