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Master Slave Self Adjusting Differential Driver

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049971D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barsotti, RH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The "Master" circuit consists of input resistors R(1), R(2) through R(n), feedback resistor R(f), control operational amplifier OAI, power driver PD1, and differential amplifier DA1. The differential amplifier has a fixed gain of k.

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Master Slave Self Adjusting Differential Driver

The "Master" circuit consists of input resistors R(1), R(2) through R(n), feedback resistor R(f), control operational amplifier OAI, power driver PD1, and differential amplifier DA1. The differential amplifier has a fixed gain of k.

The "Slave" circuit consists of reference-generating resistors R and R(23), control operational amplifier OA2, single-ended feedback resistors R(11) and R(12), and power driver PD2.

The sum of voltages V(1), V(2)... V(n) will cause OA1 to drive PD1 to generate a voltage such that: (see original).

By taking V(2) through V(n) to zero, only (see original) will determine the output voltage. This feature enables switching of various control input voltages by applying that voltage to its respective input and taking the remaining voltages to zero.

Although R(11) can be different from R(12) and R(22) can be different from R(23), the desired results of voltage centering is achieved when R(11) is equal to R(12) and R(22) is equal to R(23). For equal resistor pairs, the following relationship exists: (see original).

This relationship has several uses: one, the centering will "track" the power driver voltages, and two, the power driver voltages can be different from the control circuit voltages V(OA) and V(OB). In fact, one of the voltages V(D1) and V(D2) can be taken to zero. If either V(D1) or V(D2)) is zero, then the circuit still has differential drive but with only one power driver supply.

One...