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Method for Fabricating Polyimide Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049981D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schaefer, RR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Thin polyimide films (1-20 micrometers thick) are used in semiconductors and packaging parts. These films are usually fabricated by spinning or spraying the polyimide solution onto the surface of the sample (silicon wafer/ceramic with metal layers) and then curing it at various temperatures up to 400 degrees C for a certain time. The curing steps (time, temperature) play the important role for the fabrication of polyimide films of optimum mechanical/thermal, physical, chemical properties for semiconductor and packaging applications. Today, a variety of curing cycles exist, but an optimum curing technique is needed to overcome problems with the polyimide films (e.g., cracking).

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Method for Fabricating Polyimide Films

Thin polyimide films (1-20 micrometers thick) are used in semiconductors and packaging parts. These films are usually fabricated by spinning or spraying the polyimide solution onto the surface of the sample (silicon wafer/ceramic with metal layers) and then curing it at various temperatures up to 400 degrees C for a certain time. The curing steps (time, temperature) play the important role for the fabrication of polyimide films of optimum mechanical/thermal, physical, chemical properties for semiconductor and packaging applications. Today, a variety of curing cycles exist, but an optimum curing technique is needed to overcome problems with the polyimide films (e.g., cracking).

This method allows a soft curing of all polyimides up to approximately 210 degrees C, a temperature at which most of the large film shrinkage approximately 30% of the spinned on solution has come to an end and the crosslinking of the material has just started. This method consists of an on-line controlled temperature ramping curing as shown in Fig. 1, which operates as follows: After the solution 12 is applied on reflecting substrate 11, the sample 10 is placed on a hot plate 13 or a tube furnace. Then a He-Ne laser 14 is adjusted perpendicularly to the film surface, and the reflected beam (which is reflected from the surface of polyimide 12 and the reflecting surface of substrate 11, i.e., the Si-wafer) is measured by a photodiode 16. Shrinkage of the film 12 during heating will be immediately observed by a change in the output signal of the photodiode 16. Photodiode 16 controls the operation of hot plate control unit 17 which operates hot plate 1...