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Deep and Vacuum Ultraviolet Exposure and Dry Development in a Plasma System for Lithographic Application

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050200D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bassous, E: AUTHOR

Abstract

In this publication it is proposed that the ultraviolet (UV) radiation generated in a plasma system be used for the exposure of a multiple batch wafer in the deep UV and vacuum UV regions of the spectrum, i.e., less than 300 nm. It is potentially useful in the portable-conformable- mask (PCM) process which uses a 2-layer resist system such as photoresist on polymethyl methacrylate acrylate (PMMA). A pattern is defined in the resist by conventional optical or E-beam lithography, and the image is then transferred to the underlying PMMA by exposure to deep UV and development in the appropriate solvent.

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Deep and Vacuum Ultraviolet Exposure and Dry Development in a Plasma System for Lithographic Application

In this publication it is proposed that the ultraviolet (UV) radiation generated in a plasma system be used for the exposure of a multiple batch wafer in the deep UV and vacuum UV regions of the spectrum, i.e., less than 300 nm. It is potentially useful in the portable-conformable- mask (PCM) process which uses a 2-layer resist system such as photoresist on polymethyl methacrylate acrylate (PMMA). A pattern is defined in the resist by conventional optical or E-beam lithography, and the image is then transferred to the underlying PMMA by exposure to deep UV and development in the appropriate solvent. Deep UV sources include mercury-xenon, hydrogen or deuterium arc lamps, which generally expose one wafer at a time and, in the case of hydrogen, require extremely long exposure time due to the lack of lamps with sufficiently high intensity.

Because the wafers are immersed in the plasma, all wavelengths are incident on the wafer including the important vacuum UV region. Therefore region. Therefore, by using the appropriate gas, e.g., hydrogen, optimization or power, pressure and temperature in the plasma chamber can be made for most efficient exposure of many wafers simultaneously. The higher observed etch rate of PMMA relative to photoresist in an oxygen plasma is a characteristic which can be used to evolve a process requiring exposure followed by dry development...