Browse Prior Art Database

Silicon To Silicon Part Alignment System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050202D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 92K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bickford, HR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Silicon substrates, which are becoming more commonly used as mechanical materials, may be aligned to mating silicon parts (such as silicon retainers) by complementary configured indentations and projections in the mating structures.

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Silicon To Silicon Part Alignment System

Silicon substrates, which are becoming more commonly used as mechanical materials, may be aligned to mating silicon parts (such as silicon retainers) by complementary configured indentations and projections in the mating structures.

An alignment system for the mating parts that will be stable during the application of mechanical fasteners (such as controlled collapse solder fasteners) comprises a number of projecting structures from one silicon surface which fit into corresponding indentations in the opposing silicon surface. These complementary projections and indentations are produced by anisotropic etching of the silicon substrates.

Indentations are conveniently etched as inverted pyramidal cavities in (100) material, as shown in the photograph of Fig. 1. Complementary crenellations with a truncated quasi-pyramidal shape result from etching square positive images in (100) material, as shown in Fig. 2. It has been found that 0.125 millimeter projections are sufficient for providing positive alignment between two mating surfaces for solder joining using controlled collapse techniques.

Complex structures requiring both projections and indentations are producible using projection printing techniques and sequential etching. The structures may thus be registered with respect to other objects on the surfaces to within photolithographic tolerances. The technique may also be used for substrates other than silicon.

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