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Ribbonless Color Printing Utilizing Spheres as Print Elements

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050210D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Giordano, FP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

One major problem in using a ball-point pen as an impact print element is the difficulty and expense of assembling individual tips on either a drum or belt to create a printing mechanism. The current methods of mounting these individual tips is either soldering them to the drum or threading both tip and drum to form a nut and bolt arrangement.

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Ribbonless Color Printing Utilizing Spheres as Print Elements

One major problem in using a ball-point pen as an impact print element is the difficulty and expense of assembling individual tips on either a drum or belt to create a printing mechanism. The current methods of mounting these individual tips is either soldering them to the drum or threading both tip and drum to form a nut and bolt arrangement.

This publication describes a structure wherein the individual balls from ball- point pens are mounted in predetermined positions in a unique way. Referring to Fig. 1, the structure consists of one of three preformed sheets 10, 12, and 14. These sheets can either be punched in metal or molded in plastic. Sheet 12 provides the seat for the balls 16; an identical sheet 10 provides the mechanical support caps for the seat and also supports an ink reservoir 18. The domed shape of the support cap gives strong mechanical support to withstand the impact of print hammers. The third sheet 14, the top cap, traps the balls 16 to secure their position.

The sheets 10, 12, and 14, if metal, can be welded together locally by resistance heating as shown in Fig. 2, or, if the sheets are plastic, a localized hot melt could be used to achieve the same effect. Another benefit of using plastic is the support sheet and seating sheet would be molded as a one-piece structure.

Ink will be supplied to the printing balls from reservoir 18 through the support cap of sheet 10 and seat of shee...