Browse Prior Art Database

Clean Room Robot

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050267D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Floyd, RE: AUTHOR [+10]

Abstract

The robot is designed using a modular concept which allows the user to select only the degrees of freedom of motion needed for a given application. The motion modules consist of: (1) telescoping arm for linear motion, (2) shoulder yoke for rotary motion, (3) Z slide for linear motion, (4) rotary base for rotary motion, (5) wrist-roll, pitch, yaw for rotary motion, (6) translator base for linear motion, and (7) gripper.

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Clean Room Robot

The robot is designed using a modular concept which allows the user to select only the degrees of freedom of motion needed for a given application. The motion modules consist of: (1) telescoping arm for linear motion, (2) shoulder yoke for rotary motion, (3) Z slide for linear motion, (4) rotary base for rotary motion, (5) wrist-roll, pitch, yaw for rotary motion, (6) translator base for linear motion, and (7) gripper.

The modules 1-7 are selected and combined into a particular system, shown in Fig. 1, to obtain a given requirement. The telescoping arm 1 is the main module which provides 24 inches of extension. The motion is via closed-loop DC servo drive 10, controlled by an individual microprocessor 12. This control system is used on all motion modules.

The wrist 5 is attached to the telescoping arm and provides roll, pitch and yaw, as required. A custom gripper 7 is mounted to the wrist. The shoulder yoke 2 allows arm rotation about the shoulder access to raise or lower the gripper or reach behind. The entire system may be mounted on a tabletop or on the Z slide module 3 to provide 12 inches of Z motion. Rotation about the vertical access of the robot is achieved by adding a rotary base 4. The robot can be installed on a rail mounted translator base 6 which allows the robot to travel between work stations located outside of the robot's normal reach. The translator can be installed on a wall, floor or overhead.

The control system, shown in Fig....