Browse Prior Art Database

High Speed Line Matrix Configuration

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050285D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 3 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Zable, JL: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a dot belt printer which prints dots on several rows simultaneously, after which the print medium is advanced a distance equal to a plurality of dot rows. The article also describes an arrangement for a dot belt printer in which multiple dots are printed. The time for printing a character row in a line matrix printer is described by the following equation. t(total) equals Alpha W x N x R x M + (M-1) t(1) + t(S) where t(total) equals time to print a character row N equals number of dots/character width, i.e.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

High Speed Line Matrix Configuration

This article describes a dot belt printer which prints dots on several rows simultaneously, after which the print medium is advanced a distance equal to a plurality of dot rows. The article also describes an arrangement for a dot belt printer in which multiple dots are printed. The time for printing a character row in a line matrix printer is described by the following equation. t(total) equals Alpha W x N x R x M + (M-1) t(1) + t(S) where t(total) equals time to print a character row N equals number of dots/character width, i.e., dot

columns/ character

R equals repetition time of hammer

W equals number of characters/hammer width

M equals number of dot rows/character

t(1) equals paper increment time between dot rows

t(S) equals paper increment time between character rows

Alpha equals is a factor typically greater than one that takes

into account dot spacing on the belt to avoid

hammer to belt nipping.

Figs. 1 and 2 show a configuration in which the throughput is increased where the value of Alpha is equal to 1 and no paper incrementing is required between dot rows. As seen in Figs. 1 and 2, a line matrix printer comprises a dot belt 10 consisting of uniformly spaced fingers 11 with the successive dot elements 12 located at a vertical distance from each other that is equivalent to successive dot rows. The fingers 11 are spaced on center to center distances which allow for clearance during printing. Belt 10 moves continuously in either direction. An interposer belt 13 consists of vertical interposer fingers 14 spaced at the same spacing as the hammer 15. Interposer belt 13 can move either continuously or shuttle back and forth such that each interposer finger 14 never leaves the face of its corresponding hammer 15.

For a shuttle interposer belt 13, the interposer finger 14 will start at the right end of the hammer blade 15 at the beginning of a character row print cycle. This is shown in Fig. 3. At the start of the print cycle for the character rows the interposer finger 14 may overhang the hammer blade 15. The interposer finger 14 moves very slowly to the left. At the end of the character row print cycle, the interposer finger 14 moves to the left side of the hammer blade 15, overhanging it by an amount equal to the overhang on the right side. When the total motion for the interposer 14 from right to left equals approximately the width of the print hammer, the shuttle interposer belt 13 is slowed and its direction reversed. The next print cycle for a character row starts with the interposer shuttle moving from left to right.

During the above-described operation the printing of a character row is accomplished in the following manner: The first dot 12, for example, the highest one of a set, lines up with the interposer finger 14 at the appropriate column position on the paper, and the hammer 15 is fired. After a hammer cycle, the second dot 12 is lined up directly under the position of the first p...