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Aluminum and Aluminum Alloy Source for Computer Controlled E-Beam Deposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050289D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Emmons, DF: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article relates to improved aluminum and aluminum alloy sources, such as Al-Cu, to be used in computer-controlled E-beam thin film deposition. Inadvertently, these sources are often received having a thick oxide coating (to about 1600 Angstroms). Due to this oxide layer the sources will not melt under normal deposition conditions. Since parameters, such as electron-beam current, are continually monitored and controlled within a specific range to prevent source spitting, etc., this current cannot be increased to penetrate the oxide surface.

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Aluminum and Aluminum Alloy Source for Computer Controlled E-Beam Deposition

This article relates to improved aluminum and aluminum alloy sources, such as Al-Cu, to be used in computer-controlled E-beam thin film deposition. Inadvertently, these sources are often received having a thick oxide coating (to about 1600 Angstroms). Due to this oxide layer the sources will not melt under normal deposition conditions. Since parameters, such as electron-beam current, are continually monitored and controlled within a specific range to prevent source spitting, etc., this current cannot be increased to penetrate the oxide surface.

To overcome the above problem, etching these sources for 8 to 12 minutes in a 50-75 percent by volume nitric acid (HNO(3)) solution and water is water is proposed. The sources are rinsed in deionized water and dried in alcohol. Through this treatment the thick oxide surface has then been removed, removed, and the sources are suitable for computer-controlled thin film deposition.

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