Browse Prior Art Database

Thermocouple Heat Control Radiation Shield

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050291D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beermunder, K: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This is a proposal for an infrared radiation thermocouple shield. The radiation shield, attached to the heat control sensors, establishes the same heat characterization as the product wafers and, thus, allows an improved control of the temperature characteristics in any vacuum system.

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Thermocouple Heat Control Radiation Shield

This is a proposal for an infrared radiation thermocouple shield. The radiation shield, attached to the heat control sensors, establishes the same heat characterization as the product wafers and, thus, allows an improved control of the temperature characteristics in any vacuum system.

The drawings illustrate typical application examples of the thermo-couple radiation shield for a bottom heat (Fig. 1) as well as for a top heat (Fig. 2) vacuum deposition chamber. The same reference numbers represent like elements in the figures.

The respective vacuum chambers 1 are each provided with a substrate holder 2, a thermocouple heat sensor 3 to which radiation shield 4 is attached, and an evaporation source 5. In Fig. 1, a 270 degrees E-beam 6 provides the necessary energy to the source material to evaporate the alloy, as indicated by the arrows. A suitable heater assembly 7 is illustrated as heat lamps. For the top heat vacuum deposition chamber of Fig. 2, the heater assembly 8, 9 is shown isolated from the supporting structure. Insulators are made either of ceramic or pure quartz material. Pure quartz insulators are recommended where a sodium- free process environment is required. As evaporation source 5 in Fig. 2, an RF source is assumed with 10 designating the cooling jacket for shielding and cooling the RF source.

The provision of a thermocouple heat shield 4 effectively screens out normally observed large radiation excursion...