Browse Prior Art Database

Screen Image Rule Generation System for Test Data Specification System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050304D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 3 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hughes, GO: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The system described is capable of generating all software rules required for the testing of logic and array masterslices. It utilizes a display screen image interactive format to eliminate the query response query response dialogue of prior-art systems. This is achieved by presenting to the user several charts that closely resemble the specification of the particular technology used for the product to be tested. The data is then entered in a "fill in the blank" mode. The system then uses this data to create customized screen menus for the user to enter technology parameters from the product specification. These data are then employed to form output files which represent a complete definition of the testing environment.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 46% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Screen Image Rule Generation System for Test Data Specification System

The system described is capable of generating all software rules required for the testing of logic and array masterslices. It utilizes a display screen image interactive format to eliminate the query response query response dialogue of prior-art systems. This is achieved by presenting to the user several charts that closely resemble the specification of the particular technology used for the product to be tested. The data is then entered in a "fill in the blank" mode. The system then uses this data to create customized screen menus for the user to enter technology parameters from the product specification. These data are then employed to form output files which represent a complete definition of the testing environment.

Providing test data for LSI and VLSI (very large-scale integration) technologies has become increasingly complex and difficult in recent years. These high density technologies, containing in excess of 1,000 circuits per chip, require large volumes of information to insure adequate test coverage. For array chips which perform memory functions, test coverage requires AC testing to verify dynamic timing parameters and DC testing to verify correct voltage and current levels. Only DC testing is required for logic chips, since they do not perform any memory or timing functions. Normally, software rules, which describe the electrical parameters of a particular technology, are generated by test engineers from technology documents providing the technology specification. Once these rules are completed, they are employed by a test data specification software system to produce test programs for individual part numbers. Additional rules are also required to customize the test program for one of several testers and to specify how the device under test interfaces with the tester.

The rules for LSI and VLSI testing are numerous and complex. For array testing, the rules are generated manually on a display terminal and require many months to complete. In order to reduce such time, systems have been developed which operate in an interactive mode to generate test data specification. One such system is that described in (*). While this system provided a significant improvement over manual data entry, it was not designed for an inexperienced user, and its query-response interactive dialogue format is too cumbersome to use and too difficult to adapt to new technologies.

The software system architecture shown in Fig. 1 avoids these drawbacks. The user communicates with the screen image rule generation system within block 1 by means of interactive terminal 2 using TSO (Time Sharing Option). As is understood by those skilled in the art, TSO is a standard program that allows a user to communicate directly with the host computer, via TSO commands. By executing proper TSO commands, the user may invoke the screen image rule generation system.

The system is divided into two m...