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Non-glare Treatment of Plasma Panel Surface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050325D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Costa, MJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

A plasma or gas discharge panel is illustrated in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin 15, 2516-2517 (January 1973). One of the problems associated with conventional plasma panels is that the first surface on the front plate can act as a mirror for incident light striking it at oblique angles. A high percentage of the oblique rays are reflected, thereby obscuring the displayed image. External light reflected by the first surface is termed glare.

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Non-glare Treatment of Plasma Panel Surface

A plasma or gas discharge panel is illustrated in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin 15, 2516-2517 (January 1973). One of the problems associated with conventional plasma panels is that the first surface on the front plate can act as a mirror for incident light striking it at oblique angles. A high percentage of the oblique rays are reflected, thereby obscuring the displayed image. External light reflected by the first surface is termed glare.

An effective non-glare treatment of the surface of the front plate must do two things: It must break the surface up into discrete, randomly oriented facets to destroy specular reflectivity and prevent the surface from acting like a mirror. Secondly, degradation of the quality of the displayed image, originating some distance behind the first surface, should be minimal. The latter requires that facets on the first surface produce minimal scattering of transmitted light originating from the image.

Minimum transmissive scattering is achieved with facets having a spatial frequency, which is low compared to the highest spatial frequency present in the transmitted image. Individual facet size required for these images is so small as to be below the resolution limit of the eye at normal viewing distances. Consequently, reflections from individual facets cannot be seen, and a coherent reflection is not produced.

Independent control of both spatial frequency and amplitude of first surfa...