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Fixtures for Alignment and Exposure of Square or Rectangular Substrates Upon a Projection Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050377D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Andrews, GG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Perkin Elmer projection printers are normally used for exposing very small geometries in photoresist upon round silicon wafers in the fabrication of semiconductor products. The round wafer is held by vacuum upon a puck and brought up against an adapter ring which serves as a reference to determine an exact plane of focus for the instrument.

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Fixtures for Alignment and Exposure of Square or Rectangular Substrates Upon a Projection Printer

Perkin Elmer projection printers are normally used for exposing very small geometries in photoresist upon round silicon wafers in the fabrication of semiconductor products. The round wafer is held by vacuum upon a puck and brought up against an adapter ring which serves as a reference to determine an exact plane of focus for the instrument.

An improved puck and adapter ring are illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2. The improved fixtures make it possible to handle square or rectangular substrates on the projection printer rather than round wafers normally used. In Fig. 1, a puck 10 is illustrated which is adapted to be retained in the Perkin Elmer chuck. The puck includes an outer ring 12 surrounding a generally flat face 14. A vacuum groove 16 is formed in face 14 adapted to receive and retain a rectangular wafer in the region indicated by the dotted line. Three alignment pins 18 are provided to align the substrate with respect to the puck. Depressions 20 are provided in face 14 at either end of the substrate to permit the substrate to be placed upon the puck and removed therefrom by tweasers or an operator's fingers.

Fig. 2 illustrates an adapter ring against which the substrate can be seated when it is held by the puck. The adapter ring generally acts as a means to define an accurate focal plane of the substrate with respect to the instrument optics. The adapter ring includes an ou...