Browse Prior Art Database

Head and Paper Motion Optimization for Increase Throughput on an Advanced Function Ink Jet Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050379D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fedak, JF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An advanced function printer receives data in units of pages. The data within a page is not required to be sent in the order of printing. This neccessitates the internal buffering of an entire page within the printer before printing can begin. Furthermore, data may be placed at any position on the page that is addressable by the head since there are no line-oriented restrictions.

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Head and Paper Motion Optimization for Increase Throughput on an Advanced Function Ink Jet Printer

An advanced function printer receives data in units of pages. The data within a page is not required to be sent in the order of printing. This neccessitates the internal buffering of an entire page within the printer before printing can begin. Furthermore, data may be placed at any position on the page that is addressable by the head since there are no line-oriented restrictions.

A method is described herein of increasing throughput on an advanced function ink jet printer by analyzing print data on the pages received so as to minimize the motion of the print head. In addition, the method allows for simplified paper motion control (with the resulting cost savings) than would be necessary with other approaches.

An ink jet printer usually utilizes a one-inch head that sweeps across stationary paper, spraying ink to form printed output. At the end of each sweep, the head changes direction and the paper is moved to the next print position. A simple approach to motor control would be to print exactly one inch during each sweep followed by moving the paper one inch, sweeping the next inch, and so on. There are two problems with this approach: 1. Considerable time is wasted printing pages containing white space; this may even result in "blank" sweeps. 2. A character may be placed across an inch boundary, and thus part of it is printed in each of two sweeps. To

accommodate this possibility would complicate the design

of the character generator as well as possibly cause a

degradation in the quality of the output.

The system described herein overcomes these flaws at minimal cost.

The first problem is solved given a carriage motor with a minimum increment of considerably less than 1 inch (a common feature of those in use today). Hence, white space following each sweep could be "skipped over", with the following sweep starting at a point where data is printed. Such a scheme results in a significant performance improvement. However, the motor control logic is now more complex, and, in general, the carriage must be able to move the paper in any multiple of its base increment (sometimes not even reaching full speed).

The second problem complicates the situation further by requiring that the paper be moved less th...