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Manual Operating Procedure for a Manipulator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050591D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

The present arrangement improves the manual controls for a robotic arm. The arm is at present, under push-button control, programmed to move slowly at first, then increasing in speed until a maximum is reached. This allows fine control when making small individual movements from a stop position, and permits very close approaches to a desired position of the arm. However, it is frustrating if large movements are desired since the speed build up is delayed. It could also result in damage to the arm if a high speed approach is made to the work piece by an operator with slow reactions.

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Manual Operating Procedure for a Manipulator

The present arrangement improves the manual controls for a robotic arm. The arm is at present, under push-button control, programmed to move slowly at first, then increasing in speed until a maximum is reached. This allows fine control when making small individual movements from a stop position, and permits very close approaches to a desired position of the arm. However, it is frustrating if large movements are desired since the speed build up is delayed. It could also result in damage to the arm if a high speed approach is made to the work piece by an operator with slow reactions.

The improved procedure calls for a single step or unit of motion followed by a pause, which is, in turn, followed by continuous movement at gradually slower rates, provided that the button depression has been continuous. The approach to a work piece could be made without as much danger of a high speed collision. Referring to Fig. 1, there is shown the "jogging", i.e., a short motion increment followed by a pause. The pause time period is approximately 150 milliseconds. The drive time for one increment or push of the button is approximately .005 inch.

Fig. 2 is a plot of rate versus time obtained by a continuous button depression. As previously mentioned, the depression of the button gives a single drive time followed by the pause, which is followed by a high rate or speed of movement which diminishes with time. The advantage of such an appro...