Browse Prior Art Database

Operating Remote Control Vehicles at Fire Protection Doors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050621D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schehrer, RN: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

It is customary to divide areas in a building with fire-resistant walls to confine fires to a small area. Large openings are commonly left in these walls to permit the movement of goods between the areas. To prevent the spread of fire, these openings are fitted with fire doors which automatically close when heat or smoke reach specified limits. When material is moved from one area to another by remote control vehicles, it is common to stop these vehicles if a fire signal occurs. A hazard arises if the vehicle is stopped when located in a fire door area and prevents the fire door from closing. The solution shown above provides a parallel drive circuit for the remote control vehicle motor to allow the vehicle to run while in the fire door area even though the remote control signal would normally cause the vehicle to stop.

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Operating Remote Control Vehicles at Fire Protection Doors

It is customary to divide areas in a building with fire-resistant walls to confine fires to a small area. Large openings are commonly left in these walls to permit the movement of goods between the areas. To prevent the spread of fire, these openings are fitted with fire doors which automatically close when heat or smoke reach specified limits. When material is moved from one area to another by remote control vehicles, it is common to stop these vehicles if a fire signal occurs. A hazard arises if the vehicle is stopped when located in a fire door area and prevents the fire door from closing. The solution shown above provides a parallel drive circuit for the remote control vehicle motor to allow the vehicle to run while in the fire door area even though the remote control signal would normally cause the vehicle to stop.

Fig. 1 shows a fire wall 10 having a fire door 12 which may be automatically closed in the event of a fire. A remote control vehicle 14, with a signal receiver 16 therein to control the vehicle, is shown approaching the fire door.

The schematic diagram for the control of the motor in the remote vehicle 14 is shown in Fig. 2. The motor 18 is powered by a voltage source 20 through relay contacts 22. The relay contacts 22 are normally open. The relay coil 24 is enabled and closes contacts 22 if it receives a signal from the normal remote signal transmitter as detected and sensed by sensor 26....