Browse Prior Art Database

Spreadable Pattern Impact Tester

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050674D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bellamy, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

The use of keyboard robots, including the common electrical plunger, are good in exercising life runs on keybuttons attached to key levers. With the advent of the capacitance switch where the keybutton detail provides its own mounting configuration and stability, it becomes increasingly important to robot test the buttons of these keyboards in a manner which will distribute the wear more evenly and will more closely simulate human operator actuation. This can be accomplished by providing a scattering of the impact force over a larger area of the struck button. This is comparable to the human operator, as the latter physically cannot repeatedly impact a given button in the same exact location as the conventional robots.

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Spreadable Pattern Impact Tester

The use of keyboard robots, including the common electrical plunger, are good in exercising life runs on keybuttons attached to key levers. With the advent of the capacitance switch where the keybutton detail provides its own mounting configuration and stability, it becomes increasingly important to robot test the buttons of these keyboards in a manner which will distribute the wear more evenly and will more closely simulate human operator actuation. This can be accomplished by providing a scattering of the impact force over a larger area of the struck button. This is comparable to the human operator, as the latter physically cannot repeatedly impact a given button in the same exact location as the conventional robots.

The tester illustrated consists of a stationary housing 10 with air intake/exhaust hole and will be secured to a drive system (not shown). A compression spring 11, having the desired force to simulate actual keybutton bottoming conditions, restores the moveable toothed plunger 14 to home position after being driven the required distance 17 to activate keybutton 16. A driver cap 13 is rigidly attached to housing 10 at location 19. Driver cap 13 serves as a downstop for plunger 14 and has one or more integrally hinged circular drivers or pawl springs 20 which will engage (at the last portion of the restore stroke only) a series of pitched surfaces 21, (Fig. 2) molded into plunger 14. Drivers 20 are angled flexible ext...