Browse Prior Art Database

Menus Optimized for Performance and Ease of Use

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050705D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Billings, BE: AUTHOR [+8]

Abstract

This method incorporates some techniques that allow a complex series of menus to be optimized for performance and ease of use. Menus generally have at least two problems that can take some relatively sophisticated programming to overcome. The first problem is that of a large number of system interruptions to handle the menu-driven program.

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Menus Optimized for Performance and Ease of Use

This method incorporates some techniques that allow a complex series of menus to be optimized for performance and ease of use. Menus generally have at least two problems that can take some relatively sophisticated programming to overcome. The first problem is that of a large number of system interruptions to handle the menu-driven program.

The solution to this problem is in the display layout. Normally, if a menu option is selected, the program will exit that display and bring up an additional display with the specified options on it. The program must then present the options and give the user some technique for returning to the option menu that was initially requested. If the requested display was not the desired display, the user then has lost his point of reference for picking the correct option. Additionally, once the user returns to the menu, it will be necessary to remember which option was selected last so that choice can then be eliminated.

The display layout (Fig. 1) is to split the display when the menu is presented and show the most frequent menu option on the first display. The user can then select any of the menu options and possibly not have to select any option at all since the most frequent one is already displayed. The best cursor placement is on the option field, since the most likely event is the selection of another option. Note that the option menu appears on the top of the display and the promp...