Browse Prior Art Database

Expected Input Partitions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050741D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hopewell, P: AUTHOR

Abstract

The Terminal Operator of a terminal which supports multiple partitions (e.g., the IBM 8775) can move the cursor to any partition via the 'PARTITION JUMP' key, and hence enter data in that partition. However, some application programs may expect to receive data from a particular partition only, and must therefore check to ensure that the data was indeed entered from this partition, and take appropriate fix-up action if not.

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Expected Input Partitions

The Terminal Operator of a terminal which supports multiple partitions (e.g., the IBM 8775) can move the cursor to any partition via the 'PARTITION JUMP' key, and hence enter data in that partition. However, some application programs may expect to receive data from a particular partition only, and must therefore check to ensure that the data was indeed entered from this partition, and take appropriate fix-up action if not.

The 'expected input partition' allows an application program to specify the partition from which it expects to receive input data. Input data arriving from any other partition is trapped by IBM-supplied terminal support code, and the Terminal Operator is informed of his error. The cursor is moved to the 'expected input partition', and the Terminal Operator is invited to re-enter the input data.

This technique moves complicated programming from a customer written application program to IBM-supplied terminal support code.

The IBM 8775 display terminal supports multiple partitions. This allows the screen to be divided into several independent areas, or partitions. Each partition is represented on the screen by a viewport, in which part or all of the data from that partition is displayed. There is only one cursor on the screen, and this appears in the viewport of the active partition. The cursor movement and tab keys operate within these viewport boundaries. If the Terminal Operator hits the ENTER key or a PF key, data is transmitted from this active partition only. The transmitted datastream identifies the partition from which it originated.

The cursor can be moved from one partition to another by the Terminal Operator hitting a new key, the PARTITION JUMP key, which moves the cursor into the 'next' partition, or by the host activating a particular partition.

The PARTITION JUMP key thus allows the Terminal Operator to enter data from any partition, even if the host application program expects to receive data from a particular partition. Typically, the host application will ACTIVATE the partition from which it expects to receive data. This will position the cursor in this partition, and the Terminal Operator will thus normally enter data in this partition. However, the Terminal Operator may deliberately jump into another partition, perhaps to scroll through data in that partition for reference purposes, or may accidentally jump into another partition. If the Ter...