Browse Prior Art Database

Portable ECG Event Detector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050771D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bonner, RE: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article relates generally to electrocardiograph (ECG) apparatus and more particularly to ECG apparatus which is portable and capable of in situ processing of signals to detect the presence of undesired events in heart action.

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Portable ECG Event Detector

This article relates generally to electrocardiograph (ECG) apparatus and more particularly to ECG apparatus which is portable and capable of in situ processing of signals to detect the presence of undesired events in heart action.

Known ECG event recorders usually analyze two ECG leads and store samples of interesting ECG events in digital form. If an event is missed by the apparatus, there is no way to recover it. Also, because digital storage of events requires a fair amount of storage, there is a practical limit on the size of the program which can be used and, as a result, a compromise must be made in performance in reliable event detection.

This article involves two concepts which minimize the compromise in performance. The first requires the separation of the ECG analysis problem from the ECG storage problem, while the second involves the analysis of more leads than the number recorded.

In the figure, a portable ECG event detector system 1 is shown.

In system 1, four ECG leads 2 are used as input to a microprocessor
3. Two of these are recorded on a standard 24-hour analog recorder
4. Microprocessor 3 analyzes the four leads and records digitally only the times of interesting events. These times and the identification of which type of event occurred are written in digital form on the analog tape at the end of the recording period. This procedure solves two problems. 1) Since only the times of events are stored, more space

is available for the analysis p...